Canadian Urban Libraries Council/Conseil des Bibliothèques Urba

CULC in The News

A Date with the New Calgary Central Library

New Central Library banner graphic

Thursday, September 4th, 6-8 pm
Calgary TELUS Convention Centre, Hall E

Come see a preview of Calgary’s New Central Library, a key landmark in East Village, and one of the most open and welcoming gathering places in the city.

Register for this free event. Reserve your seat today, as space is limited. First come, first served! Please pass this invitation on to your colleagues.

On September 4, we are delighted to invite you to attend a one-of-a-kind evening of design discussion in the company of some of the world’s best library architects and some of the world’s most enthusiastic library users. (You may count yourself among them!) You’ll get an up close look at the design features, amenities and function of the New Central Library, which is imagined as a new cultural and educational landmark in the downtown core and East Village.

The evening will bring together Calgarians and architects Craig Dykers of Snøhetta and Rob Adamson of Calgary’s DIALOG, who were announced as Prime Design consultants in November, 2013. Since then, the two renowned firms have been busy creating a 21st century civic institution – one that’s designed to be the heart of Calgary’s public library system for the next century, and one that’s built on the input of some 16,000 Calgarians. Snøhetta and DIALOG took the results of the surveys, questionnaires, events and interviews that happened throughout the city in 2012 to 2014 and have designed an inspired (and inspiring) hub of community service and lifelong learning.

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CULC/CBUC Teleconference BRIEFING on CASL Legal Opinion (Wed, Sept 10)

Wednesday, September 10 @ 1:30 Eastern / 10:30 Pacific

CULC/CBUC partnered with Ontario’s Federation of Ontario Public Libraries on a legal opinion on the Canadian Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL) and the implications for public libraries. The Executive decided to pursue this after a number of conflicting opinions had been received from various sources including City Solicitors. There are a number of recommendations made in the Legal Opinion. A proposed Library Policy is being worked on as an extension.

The document will be sent to all CULC/CBUC Members on August 26. It will be embargoed as a CULC/CBUC Member Benefit for 90 days. Same applies for FOPL Members. The document is just over 50 pages. There are a number of recommendations for libraries to pursue in the document.

CULC/CBUC has arranged for a Member-only Presentation and Q&A session with Mannit Zemel, the lawyer who wrote the opinion. Maanit Zemel is the founder of MTZ Law, an internet law and commercial litigation boutique law firm in Toronto. Ms. Zemel has substantial experience and expertise in internet law, including Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL), online defamation and cyberbullying. Ms. Zemel regularly advises businesses, charities, and non-profits on practical and effective CASL compliance policies and procedures. Prior to starting MTZ Law, Ms. Zemel was a partner at a large national law firm.

Call is open to all CULC/CBUC Members. CEOs and Senior Staff as approved by CEO. Format will be a presentation followed by Q & A.

TELECONFERENCE INFORMATION

Wednesday, September 10 @ 1:30 Eastern / 10:30 Pacific
Sent directly to members.

There will be a PowerPoint presentation distributed in advance of the call. The call will be recorded and archived in the Member Only Area of the CULC/CBUC website.

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Fall 2014 Meeting – Kitchener Hotel info

Group rates will be held until September 5, 2014.

Crowne Plaza Hotel

Please book online or by calling the Reservations Department at 519-744-4141 or the hotel’s Global Reservations Centre at 1-877-408-6665. Guests must identify themselves as being with the group, CULC.

The Crowne Plaza is easily accessed from 401 via Highway 8 (which becomes King Street) to the corner of King and Benton Streets in downtown Kitchener. The walking distance to Kitchener Public Library from the hotel is 2 ½ blocks.

The room rate of $129.00 per night includes complimentary onsite parking for overnight guests. Breakfast is not included but full room service is available or in the main floor hotel restaurant.

A gym, whirlpool, swimming pool, and sauna are also available onsite.

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Edmonton Public Library is the Gale LJ Library of the Year

Edmonton Public Library is the first Canadian library to win the award from Library Journal.

Read the article: library journal.com

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Centre for Equitable Library Access Launches

For Immediate Release

Launch of new library service provides accessible books to over three million Canadians with print disabilities

May 29, 2014 – Victoria, BC: The Centre for Equitable Library Access (CELAlibrary.ca) officially launched its new national service which provides accessible library services and materials to Canadians with print disabilities. The announcement was made at the Canadian Library Association’s National Conference in Victoria, BC.

Over three million Canadians have a print disability. This could be a learning, physical or visual disability that prevents a person from reading conventional print. For the 10 per cent of Canadians who have a print disability, access to reading materials in alternate formats like audio, braille and described video is often an ongoing challenge. Research shows that access to a broad range of reading materials has a direct and positive impact on a child’s success in school and in life. CELA makes it possible for these Canadians to gain easy access to a wealth of reading materials, in formats of their choice, right in their own communities through their local public library.

offers member public libraries:

  • A broad choice of formats including audio, braille, e-text and described video
  • Access to a growing collection of over 230,000 alternate format items including books, magazines, newspapers and described videos
  • Access to Bookshare (bookshare.org), the world’s largest online library of accessible reading materials. Bookshare is an American organization that works with publishers to obtain new releases and back catalogues of their works. Bookshare books can be downloaded to a computer, mobile device such as a smartphone and tablet, or braille displays. Their catalogue is rapidly expanding, and all CELA members have access to more than 160,000 books.
  • A broad selection of genres: fiction, non-fiction, poetry, children’s, young adult, business, self-help, poetry and more
  • A choice of delivery options: Direct download to computer, handheld devices and DAISY player; CD and braille mailed to home
  • Support for community outreach and summer reading programs
  • Training and expertise on accessibility
  • Bilingual collections and service

While May 29 marks the official launch, over 600 public library systems across Canada are already CELA members, or 75 per cent of Canadian public libraries. These member libraries are serving over 85 per cent of Canadians. Ninety-four percent of Canada’s First Nations libraries are CELA members. And the CELA membership is growing.

About CELA

CELA is a new, national non-profit organization established by Canadian public libraries to provide equitable public library services for Canadians with print disabilities. CELA provides services to libraries to enable them to serve their patrons who have a visual, learning or physical disability that prevents them from reading conventional print. CELA is governed by a Board made up of public library representatives from across Canada, and is supported by the Canadian Urban Libraries Council (CULC) and CNIB (the Canadian National Institute for the Blind).Together, we champion the fundamental right of Canadians with print disabilities to access media and reading materials in a format of their choice.

Background and Frequently Asked Questions documents available upon request.

At the launch, 14-year-old Rachell Morton, a CELA patron and member of the Greater Victoria Public Library, spoke about the impact on her life of the availability of CELA services. Media interviews with Rachell, as well as with other CELA users and CELA member public libraries can be arranged upon request.

For more information contact:
Jennifer Murray, CELA
(416) 820-9707
media@celalibrary.ca

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What is CELA?
CELA is a new, national non-profit organization established by Canadian public libraries to support the provision of accessible collections for Canadians with print disabilities and to champion the fundamental right of Canadians with print disabilities to access media and reading materials in the format of their choice, including audio, braille, e-text and descriptive video. CELA is supported by the Canadian Urban Libraries Council (CULC).

What does CELA do?
CELA provides services to public libraries to support their patrons with print disabilities, including learning, physical or visual disabilities that prevent someone from reading conventional print. With this in mind, CELA produces and distributes a growing collection of items including books, magazines, newspapers and described videos in a number of choices of formats and delivery methods. CELA also provides public libraries with support, expertise and training on accessibility.

Who is CELA?
CELA is a public library membership organization. It is governed by a Board made up of public library representatives from across Canada, with various Board committees and public library and consumer advisory groups.

What services does CELA offer?
CELA offers member libraries:

  • A variety of formats including audio, braille, e-text and descriptive video
  • Access to a growing 230,000+ collection, including books, magazines, newspapers and described videos
  • Bilingual collection and service
  • Access to Bookshare, the world’s largest online library of accessible books. Bookshare is an American organization that works with publishers to obtain new releases and back catalogues of their works, then uses features like text-to-speech or digital braille to make these works accessible. Their catalogue is rapidly expanding every day, and all CELA members have access to over 160,000 books.
  • Delivery options: Direct download to computers, handheld devices and DAISY players; CD and braille mailed to home
  • Community outreach and summer reading program support
  • Training and advice on accessibility matters
  • Service infrastructure already scaled to serve over 1 million Canadians

Who can access CELA collections?
Any member of a participating library who has a learning, visual, or physical disability that prevents them from reading conventional print.

How do public libraries deliver CELA services to their customers?
People with print disabilities sign up for public library service at their local public library and, if eligible, are introduced to the library’s accessible services, including CELA collections. These collections are available in different formats and can be downloaded onto a computer or device, or be delivered by mail to the patron’s home.

Is there a fee for libraries to offer CELA services? Is there a fee for customers to access CELA services?
Depending on the size of the library system, and what province it is in, there may be a fee for libraries to join CELA. Several provinces are providing full funding for their libraries to join CELA. In non-funding provinces, there is a fee based on the population served by the library. This covers a portion of the costs, with the balance underwritten this year by CNIB.

For library patrons, the service is free with their library card.

What is CNIB's relationship to CELA?
CNIB is the service provider of CELA services for CELA Library Members and their customers, including providing alternative format production and delivery services and support.

CNIB is also a critical partner in a national solution for accessible format materials, supporting advocacy and funding efforts for CELA services.

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